J-2X Engine Test/Nozzle Extension Goes the Distance (NASA, J-2X, SLS, 07/13/12)

Check out these your tests images:

J-2X Engine Test/Nozzle Extension Goes the Distance (NASA, J-2X, SLS, 07/13/12)
your tests
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
NASA engineers conducted a 550-second test of the new J-2X rocket engine at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi on July 13. The J-2X engine will power the upper-stage of a planned two-stage Space Launch System, or SLS. The SLS will launch NASA’s Orion spacecraft and other payloads, and provide an entirely new capability for human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Designed to be safe, affordable and flexible for crew and cargo missions, the SLS will continue America’s journey of discovery and exploration to destinations including nearby asteroids, Lagrange points, the moon and ultimately, Mars.

The test, conducted on the A-2 Test Stand, continued a series of firings to gather critical data for engine development. This was the first flight-duration test of the engine’s nozzle extension, a bell shaped device to increase engine performance.

Operators collected data about the nozzle extension’s performance in conditions that simulated heights up to 50,000 feet. Additionally, operators introduced different propellant pressures at startup to test how the engine reacted. The J-2X is being developed by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne for NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. It is the first liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen rocket engine rated to carry humans into space to be developed in 40 years.

Credit: NASA/SSC

View NASA feature:
www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/j2x/j2x_july13_1.html

More about the J-2X Engine Development:
www.nasa.gov/j2x

There’s a Flickr photoset about the J-2X egnine development, if you’d like to know more: www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/sets/72157625345364038/

_____________________________________________
These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin…

DSCF4358
your tests
Image by Déclencheur de Paysage
Test "OLD STYLE SEPIA"
Look at this if you have not ,sometimes ,an idea…
Friendly 🙂
(Press L to enlarge and to see a detals)

DM-2 Motor Roars in Successful Test (NASA, ATK, 08/31/10)

A few nice all your testing images I found:

DM-2 Motor Roars in Successful Test (NASA, ATK, 08/31/10)
all your testing
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Editor’s Note: I also meant to add this link so you can see the motor test that created these great images: www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?media_id=…

This image is one of a series that shows the column of fire and smoke from the successful test of the DM-2 motor in Brigham City, Utah. The info below comes from the NASA news release.
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With a loud roar and mighty column of flame, NASA and ATK Aerospace Systems successfully completed a two-minute, full-scale test of the largest and most powerful solid rocket motor designed for flight. The motor is potentially transferable to future heavy-lift launch vehicle designs.

The stationary firing of the first-stage development solid rocket motor, dubbed DM-2, was conducted by ATK, a division of Alliant Techsystems of Brigham City, Utah. DM-2 is the most heavily instrumented solid rocket motor in NASA history, with a total of 53 test objectives measured through more than 760 instruments.

Prior to the static test, the solid rocket motor was cooled to 40 degrees Fahrenheit to verify the performance of new materials and assess motor performance at low temperatures during the full-duration test. Initial test data showed the motor performance met all expectations.

The first-stage solid rocket motor is designed to generate up to 3.6-million pounds of thrust at launch. Information collected from this test, together with data from the first development motor test last year, will be evaluated to better understand the performance and reliability of the design.

Although similar to the solid rocket boosters that help power the space shuttle to orbit, the five-segment development motor includes several upgrades and technology improvements implemented by NASA and ATK engineers. Motor upgrades from a shuttle booster include the addition of a fifth segment, a larger nozzle throat, and upgraded insulation and liner. The motor cases are flight-proven hardware used on shuttle launches for more than three decades. The cases used in this ground test have collectively launched 59 previous missions.

After more testing, the first-stage solid rocket motor will be certified to fly at temperature ranges between 40-90 degrees Fahrenheit. The solid rocket motor was built as an element of NASA’s Constellation Program and is managed by the Ares Projects Office at Marshall. ATK Aerospace Systems is the prime contractor.

Read entire news release:
www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/constellation/ares/10-202.html

Image credit: ATK

p.s. You can see all of the Ares photos in the Ares Group in Flickr at: www.flickr.com/groups/ares/ We’d love to have you as a member!

D810 Test Shot_ISO100_DSC_4375
all your testing
Image by idua_japan
Camera : Nikon D810
Lens : 58mm/F1.4G

「View all size」から、3600万画素のオリジナルデータをダウンロードすることができます。

Please check " View all size " that you can download original 36 megapixels.

この写真は、NikonのD750の発売記念イベント「Nikon Digital Live 2014」のモデル撮影コーナーで、デモのカメラで撮影しました。

This photograph was taken with the camera of the demonstration at the model photography corner of the sale commemoration event of D750 of Nikon "Nikon Digital Live 2014."

www.nikon-image.com/event/ndl2014/

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He was a friend of mine
all your testing
Image by Brian Hathcock
In my college experience, I had the option of taking either Biology or Chemistry. As any sane person would, I chose chemistry. I was expecting math and symbols and beakers—which I received in great quantity—but I got something of a surprise. My teacher was Dr. Perry L. Weston, a goofy man of 78 at the time. Dr. Weston turned out to be one of the best teachers I ever had. He was fun, sharp, and kind. From this man I learned a lot about the universe, chemically and otherwise.

He lived a very interesting life, which he shared every so often during class when students became tired of the elements. Perry had been all over the world, met people of every rank, and had more talent and wisdom than I ever hope to achieve.

I would usually stay after class to speak with Dr. Weston. We would talk about everything: NCAA basketball, love, Africa, his painting and my photography. He once brought a bunch of his work at my request for me to look over. Luckily, one of his original paintings hangs over the mantel of my living room.

The last time I saw Dr. Weston was December of 2005. I bumped into him outside of Stanly Community College. He wished me a merry Christmas. Since then I have always wanted to visit him. "I really need to go speak with him again. Take my camera and get a picture with him."

But life became too busy. I haven’t been to see him.

The day before yesterday, I was searching for his information online because I could not find the paper on which he’d written his address and phone number, and who knows where our phone book is? I was going to call him and ask if he would mind being a reference. I knew the answer would be yes, as he said two years ago that he would be glad to do such a thing if I ever needed it, but I just wanted to speak with him.

Dr. Weston had lots of faith in me. He would always encourage me. No matter how many of his tests I aced, he could sense that I was completely devoid of any confidence. "Brian you’re going to be a great teacher. I know how smart you are. You gotta have more faith." He would say things similar to that.

Anyway, as I browsed my search results, I fell onto this, like a spike into my chest. I read:

Perry Weston, 80, of Concord died December 10, 2006 of complications from an aneurysm. “Doc” was a man who enthusiastically enjoyed his life.

Perry was born and raised in Illinois. He received his undergraduate degree from Purdue University and went on to earn his PhD from the University of Utah. He worked as a metallurgist, chemist and engineer in the steel industry. Midlife, he found a new calling as a college professor teaching students that they could conquer chemistry and math. He loved to sing in the choir and when he sang children would look around to see who was singing so exuberantly. He pursued his painting and drawing, using his analytical eye to capture the essence of the natural world.

Those who knew Perry would describe him as an unforgettable character. He was a smart, wonderful and cantankerous husband, father and grandfather who had a great run, and will be sorely missed.

Perry is survived by his wife, Carol, their children Craig, Karen and Paula and grandchildren Owen, Gus and Sophie, and his sister Shirley.

I wept and sobbed and cried all morning.

I didn’t know him well enough. I should have visited. I wanted to know him better. I want to remember him better. I want to tell his wife what her husband did for me, though I knew him too little.

The next day I wrote an e-mail to Jennie Tomlin, an artist and part of the Cabarrus County Arts Guild. She had known Dr. Weston, had worked with him in a sort of art club for the last twelve years. I told her about my sorrow and regret, and what Perry had meant to me. She returned:

I am so pleased that you shared this message with me, and I will pass it along to his wife, who is also a dear friend of mine. I will give her your email and I am sure she would want to respond to you.

Perry was a wonderful friend and was a student of mine for 12 years. He and his wife shared many happy times and memories together, and I think he was a wonderful painter. I am grateful that I spend several hours with him in the hospital on the Sunday morning before he died that evening. He was such a great and caring person as I am aware that you know. I , several years ago, had the misfortune of tearing some ligaments and muscles loose from the bone in my hip area and was to be flat on my back for about 4 weeks. Perry walked in one day with the oddest looking contraption I had ever seen and it turned out to be an easel that he had rigged and built for me so that I could paint while lying flat in the bed!!! That is true friendship!

Thank you so much for sharing your feelings and thoughts. You have made my day. I am sure that some of Perry will be with you all of your days as he will with mine.

I can’t imagine all the people Dr. Weston touched during his long life. If I could be so affected knowing him for only two years, I can’t guess, either, about his family.

Dr. Weston was my friend. I miss him. I can only wish, wish, wish now that I had went to see him. I’m trying to be grateful that I was able to know him and forget the things I didn’t do.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Inspiration and motivation have been very absent the past month or more, and I hadn’t touched my camera until yesterday morning. I had to get out and do something that would make me feel better. There was more to it than that, though, I guess. I had thought about Dr. Weston and his perception of life and the world—even now I find inspiration in my memories of him.

The morning offered up some tranquil scenes at Morrow Mountain.

J-2X Powerpack Test Sets Record (NASA, J-2X, SLS, 06/08/12)

A few nice all your testing images I found:

J-2X Powerpack Test Sets Record (NASA, J-2X, SLS, 06/08/12)
all your testing
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
During a record-breaking June 8 test, engineers throttled the J-2X powerpack up and down several times to explore numerous operating points required for the fuel and oxidizer turbopumps. The results of this test will be useful for determining performance and hardware life for the J-2X engine turbopumps. The J-2X engine will power the upper stage of the evolved NASA¹s Space Launch System, an advanced heavy-lift rocket that will provide an entirely new national capability for human exploration beyond Earth¹s orbit. The test was conducted at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne is developing the J-2X engine for NASA¹s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

Credit: NASA/SSC

View NASA feature:
www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/j2x/12-167.html

More about the J-2X Engine Development:
www.nasa.gov/j2x

There’s a Flickr photoset about the J-2X egnine development, if you’d like to know more: www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/sets/72157625345364038/

_____________________________________________
These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin…

Einstein’s Theory Fights Off Challengers (NASA, Chandra, 04/14/10)

Check out these only your test images:

Einstein’s Theory Fights Off Challengers (NASA, Chandra, 04/14/10)
only your test
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Two different teams have reported using Chandra observations of galaxy clusters to study the properties of gravity on cosmic scales and test Einstein’s theory of General Relativity. Such studies are crucial for understanding the evolution of the universe, both in the past and the future, and for probing the nature of dark energy, one of the biggest mysteries in science.

This composite image of the galaxy cluster Abell 3376 shows X-ray data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the ROSAT telescope in gold, an optical image from the Digitized Sky Survey in red, green and blue, and a radio image from the VLA in blue. The "bullet-like" appearance of the X-ray data is caused by a merger, as material flows into the galaxy cluster from the right side. The giant radio arcs on the left side of the image may be caused by shock waves generated by this merger.

The growth of galaxy clusters like Abell 3376 is influenced by the expansion rate of the Universe — controlled by the competing effects of dark matter and dark energy — and by the properties of gravity over large scales. By contrast, observations of supernovas or the large-scale distribution of galaxies, which measure cosmic distances, depend only on the expansion rate of the universe and are not sensitive to the properties of gravity.

In the first of the new studies of gravity, an alternative theory to General Relativity called "f(R) gravity" was tested. In this theory, the acceleration of the expansion of the universe does not come from an exotic form of energy but from a modification of the gravitational force. Mass estimates of galaxy clusters in the local universe were compared with model predictions for f(R) gravity. Data from geometrical studies, such as supernova work, were also used. Using this comparison between theory and observation, no evidence was found that gravity is different from General Relativity on scales larger than 130 million light years. This limit corresponds to a hundred-fold improvement on the bounds of the modified gravitational force’s range that can be set without using the cluster data.

In the second study, a comparison was made between X-ray observations of how rapidly galaxy clusters have grown over cosmic time to the predictions of General Relativity. Once again, data from geometrical studies such as distances to supernovas and galaxy clusters were incorporated. Nearly complete agreement was seen between observation and theory, arguing against any alternative gravity models with a different rate of growth. In particular "DGP gravity" (named after its inventors Gia Dvali, Gregory Gabadadze, and Massimo Porrati) predicts a slower rate of cluster growth than General Relativity, because gravity is weakened on large scales as it leaks into an extra dimension. Like f(R) gravity, the DGP model is designed to avoid the need for an exotic form of energy causing cosmic acceleration.

Chandra observations of galaxy clusters have previously been used to show that dark energy has stifled the growth of these massive structures over the last 5 billion years and to provide independent evidence for the existence of dark energy by offering a different way to measure cosmic distances.

Read entire caption/view more images: chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2010/a3376/

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/A. Vikhlinin; ROSAT Optical: DSS Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA/IUCAA/J.Bagchi

Caption credit: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Read more about Chandra:
www.nasa.gov/chandra

p.s. You can see all of our Chandra photos in the Chandra Group in Flickr at: www.flickr.com/groups/chandranasa/ We’d love to have you as a member!

Alpine silence
only your test
Image by Jim Nix / Nomadic Pursuits
This is Middle Fork Lake which sits high above Red River, NM. It is a beautiful spot as you can see. We had decided to spend the day hiking up to Middle Fork, which is about a 2 hour hike one way. There are great trails to walk on and some nice views along the way, including a great waterfall which I will share soon. We had our backpacks full of lunch and drinks so we headed out. After what seemed like an eternity, we thought we were almost there. We met a hiker coming down, and asked her if we were getting close, and she said "yeah, only about 8 more switchbacks". What? 8 more? Well, we finally made it and were rewarded with this beautiful scene. The nice thing was that the lake was essentially deserted – very few hikers that day. So there was this awesome silence, just the wind rustling the trees and these great clouds drifting by. I cruised around snapping a bunch of pictures, we lunched and rested, and headed home.

from the blog at www.nomadicpursuits.com